Final Thought


BVA Training Coordinator Wade Davis and Senior National Field Service Officer Claudia Belk demonstrate daily the spirit of independence and the determination to be self-reliant as they navigate buildings, streets, public parks, crosswalks, and, in this case, a sidewalk in Alexandria, Virginia.

BVA Training Coordinator Wade Davis and Senior National Field Service Officer Claudia Belk navigating a sidewalk in Alexandria, Virginia.


A joint resolution of the U.S. Congress, H.R. 753, was signed into law on October 6, 1964. The resolution authorized the President of the United States to proclaim October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety Day.

President Lyndon B. Johnson then recognized the white cane as a practical symbol of independence for the blind and visually impaired in the first of dozens of Presidential proclamations to follow, including the 2016 proclamation signed by President Barack Obama.

Notwithstanding their vision loss, veterans such as BVA Training Coordinator Wade Davis and Senior National Field Service Officer Claudia Belk demonstrate daily the spirit of independence and the determination to be self-reliant as they navigate buildings, streets, public parks, crosswalks, and, in this case, a sidewalk in Alexandria, Virginia.

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