What to do when you see a blind person

  • When you address a blind person, identify yourself immediately so there is no mystery as to who you are.

  • Speak directly to a blind person so the individual can follow your voice.

  • Don’t assume that a blind person is unable to participate in certain activities.  Let that person make the decision.

  • When guiding a blind person, offer your arm for assistance.  A blind person can anticipate your movements by walking slightly behind you.

  • When you’re leaving … say so.

  • It’s okay to use words like “look,” “see,” and “blind.”  Avoiding them may make a blind person self-conscious.

  • Offer understanding, consideration, and friendship to a blind person – not pity!

  • Caution a blind person about ascending or descending stairs, curbs, or obstacles.

  • Offer assistance when you see a blind person trying to cross a busy intersection, but don’t be discouraged by a “No, thank you.”

  • Offer to read newspapers, magazines, and other printed material for a blind person.

  • Let blind people speak for themselves – they don’t need interpreters.

  • When speaking to a blind person, don’t raise your voice.  Remember, that person is blind, not deaf.

  • Don’t distract a guide dog from his main purpose of safely leading his master.  Ask for permission before petting.